Amid COVID-19 and a failing MBTA, more and more people turn to biking

The rise of Bluebikes has helped fuel an increase in the number of people traveling on two wheels in the Boston area. Photo by Henry Shifrin.

My wonderful Northeastern intermediate reporting students have produced a terrific story on urban biking for The Scope, our School of Journalism’s digital publication covering issues related to social justice.

Here’s how we did it. Eleven of the 14 students interviewed experts, policymakers and ordinary cyclists, combining all of their notes onto one Google Doc. One student took photos. Two contributed research. Each of them wrote a story based on everyone’s notes. Finally, I pulled together an article from several of their stories.

I am pleased with the results and incredibly proud of my students. You can read their story right here.

One thought on “Amid COVID-19 and a failing MBTA, more and more people turn to biking

  1. Great article. I have been biking and riding the T and walking as my main modes of transportation since I arrived here as a student 40 years ago. I am grateful for every new bike lane I encounter (although I appreciate the stress that some local business owners feel about less parking as a result). I am happy to have learned about the month of free Blue Bike membership offered earlier this year as well as the book about bicycling by Reverend Everett. The main downside about biking for me is my fellow cyclists, who often speed by with no bell ring or verbal “on your left” to alert me to their presence. And some even pass on the right! There is also the issue of e-bikes, which are often more like e-mopeds or even e-motorcycles and probably belong on the road with cars and not in a bike lane (or on a bike trail with people walking, babies in strollers, dogs on leashes, etc.) due to how fast and how blithely people seem to be riding them… However, these are the problems/challenges we want to have. Fewer cars on the road is always a plus! Thank you to you and your students for this excellent article. — will mcmillan

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