Who are those unnamed “political blogs”?

Adam Gaffin has posted the best piece of media criticism you’ll read all weekend. Heh.

9 thoughts on “Who are those unnamed “political blogs”?

  1. Harrybosch

    The Globe probably just assumed you were bloviating beyond your expertise.

    And much as I’d hate to lose any newspaper, be hilarious if you outlasted them.

  2. Rick in Duxbury

    Dan,
    Perhaps the Globe is just insecure from the readership implosion partially prompted by agenda journalism? For example, if Wikipedia is to be believed on the subject, Cleveland enjoys enviable readership of both Sunday and daily papers. The Plain Dealer leans right in a Democratic town and nonetheless is a beneficiary. When people try to report the news instead of pushing an agenda, interesting things can happen, (some hilarious as exemplified below).
    http://www.cleveland.com/open/index.ssf/2010/01/letter_writer_claims_diverse_r.html

  3. Scutch

    Having lived in Ohio, I can tell you that it is also true that people in Cleveland are less likely to pick up the New York Times, which gives the Plain Dealer a lot more breathing room.

  4. Rick in Duxbury

    You would be amazed at the number of people who make it through a day without The Gray Lady. (Maybe those folks are busy at the Rock & Roll Museum!)

  5. Al

    “Perhaps the Globe is just insecure from the readership implosion partially prompted by agenda journalism?”

    I don’t think so. I do know people who complain about the Globe, but then again, they’re already Herald readers and ‘RKO listeners, so they’ve already looked for an “agenda driven” source for their information. Both sides have axes to grind. Even so, it hasn’t cause an implosion. The economy, and dynamics of the news publishing industry has.

  6. The larger point though is that the Globe and other newspapers should be reporting when someone else breaks the story. It would not have harmed the story had they wrote:

    “The brouhaha began Thursday, when Dan Kennedy, an assistant professor at Northeastern University’s School of Journalism, noted on his Media Nation blog that Brown denied he had made an endorsement.”

    Eh?

  7. Danny L. McDaniel

    We are now well into the 21st century. The American lifestyle has changed and newspapers should have gotten the electronic memo by now. Blogs are a strange combination of phone calls, textbooks, direct mail, radio, TV, and newspapers, and mixed with the First Amendment have transformed political action in this country. It just hasn’t solved any issues, yet. Like the old French proverb, “The more things change, the more they stay the same.”

    Danny L. McDaniel
    Lafayette, Indiana

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