Daniel Schorr, 1916-2010

Schorr (left) and Simon

NPR commentator Daniel Schorr has died at the age of 93. A legendary reporter who was on Richard Nixon’s enemies list, lost his job at CBS News after he leaked classified information and then reinvented himself at an age when most people would have been content to retire, Schorr was among the last living journalists to have covered the post-World War II reconstruction of Europe.

Schorr’s days as a working reporter were over before I had started paying attention to the news, but I enjoyed his sharp, intelligent commentaries on NPR. At one time he sounded so weak that I wondered how much longer he could continue. But despite his age, seemed to recover his strength during the past couple of years.

He was on the air as recently as July 10, talking with “Weekend Edition” host Scott Simon about the U.S.-Russian spy swap and President Obama’s visit with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Here’s what Schorr said about the delicate state of U.S.-Israeli relations:

Neither can afford to be very long on bad terms with the other because of their domestic constituencies. And so, they have problems. And I’m sure the problems in private are discussed at much greater length than they do in public. But in the end, it’s likely they’ll come back together again, because they are condemned to be good friends.

Schorr may well have been the last journalist alive who had been recruited to CBS News by the legendary Edward R. Murrow. His death marks not just the passing of a fine reporter, but of a piece of history as well.

When Media Nation met Suldog

This past Saturday, I had the honor of introducing the 2005 film “Good Night, and Good Luck,” about the life of Edward R. Murrow, at the Boston Athenaeum, part of a “Civic Discourse” series it’s running along with Suffolk University.

I also had a chance to meet Jim Sullivan, who writes the excellent local blog Suldog, as well as Mrs. Suldog. Jim has got some interesting things to say about Murrow and the how the media landscape has changed since the 1950s, when Murrow’s CBS program “See It Now” played a major role in ending the witch-hunting career of Sen. Joseph McCarthy.

Self-referential post of the day

I just noticed that the banner ad at the top of Media Nation is promoting a screening of “Good Night, and Good Luck,” the 2005 film about Edward R. Murrow, which will be shown this Saturday at the Boston Athenaeum in conjunction with Suffolk University. (You might have to hit “reset.”)

As it turns out, I’ll be introducing the film. Hope to see you there.