The latest Nikole Hannah-Jones snub is not going to end well for the Middlesex School

Eliot Hall at the Middlesex School. Public domain photo by Daderot.

I think it’s pretty obvious that we’re only in the beginning stages of learning the story behind the Middlesex School’s decision to invite, and then uninvite, New York Times journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones to speak during Black History Month. Middlesex is an exclusive prep school in Concord. Hannah-Jones is best known for the 1619 Project, a reimagining of the role of slavery in American history that won her a Pulitzer Prize.

What always amazes me when something like this happens is the failure of the imagination we see on the part of those in charge. Does David Beare, the head of school who issued a limp statement about concerns over “individuals from outside our community” making a ruckus, really think this is going to end well either for the school or for him? This is not North Carolina.

A few other points worth noting. Among the school’s trustees is New York Times columnist Bret Stephens, a conservative and frequent critic of so-called cancel culture. Will he speak up on behalf of his Times colleague? Another prominent trustee is Cass Sunstein, a well-known Harvard Law School professor and a good bet to criticize this abomination.

Of possibly more significance is that Robert and Anne Bass are both vice presidents of the board. As Gabriel Snyder observes, the Basses are “part of a billionaire family that has bankrolled a lot of campus conservative outrage over the years.”

Stay tuned. There is going to be much more to come, I’m sure.

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4 thoughts on “The latest Nikole Hannah-Jones snub is not going to end well for the Middlesex School

  1. I predict that the conservatives on the board will remain silent. That’s because cancel culture has never been about cancellation per se, but about ensuring that conservative voices predominant, no matter how ignorant or ill-informed.

  2. Kevin Wesley

    The conservatives on the board don’t need to speak. They’ve already achieved their goal. I suspect there were lots of behind-the-scenes conversations that led to this reversal.

  3. Pingback: Recriminations begin in school’s decision to uninvite Nikole Hannah-Jones – Media Nation

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