Was the moon landing faked, too?

What do global-warming deniers have in common with creationists? More than you might think. They got Charles Darwin trapped out there on Highway Five.

About these ads

9 thoughts on “Was the moon landing faked, too?

  1. BP Myers

    In which course, exactly, would Global Warming even come up?

    Readin’, writin’, or ‘rithmatic?

  2. Steve Stein

    It is all of a piece – science is BAD! Will we see a resurgence of the “Pi is exactly 3” crowd?

    Peter Daou has a great column today about the motivations of the anti-science thugs:

    This isn’t about good faith questioning of science, much as these naysayers pretend it is. It isn’t about genuine skepticism, much as they want to believe it is. There is no moral imperative underlying their belief (or lack thereof). It’s about unbridled hostility at the suggestion that we must all make shared sacrifices.

  3. Neil Sagan

    Kentucky is intent on teaching “the advantages and disadvantages of scientific theories,” by which I presume they mean ‘the merit’ as opposed to how, if taken as ‘gospel truth’, the impact would affect us. We try to use the law to do many things it was not intended to do, such a make people stop saying ‘midget’ and use another word instead amd shape educational policy. Thank god for the bright line called the first amendment.

  4. Neil Sagan

    Fair enough.

    I just spent a few minutes on wiktionary looking up the words dwarf, midget, short and learned that midget is derogatory when used to describe short people.

    I wonder if its enough to teach people that short people generally find the derogatory when its used with that intent.

    When we choose to stop saying a word, even in the context of making this point, we make it taboo and give it more power.

    Rather than say M-word, we can say short people in general are offended when you describe them as midgets. Just as we can say black people in general are offended when you call them niggers with derogatory intent.

    Its our language and how we use it can be respectful or disrespectful of others. Taking words off the table in all contexts is creating taboo that has the opposite effect of the lessons we’d like others to learn about respect and consideration of other people feelings. The word is not the problem. Words themselves are not good or bad, the intent with which they are used can be helpful or hurtful.

    1. Dan Kennedy Post author

      @Neil: Other than blacks joking among themselves, it is hard to imagine any context in which you could use the N-word without “derogatory intent.” That said, I’m not into banning words. But just because they’re not banned doesn’t mean you have to use them.

  5. LFNeilson

    Rhesus Cripes! I’ll be a monkey’s uncle if there ain’t no global warming.
    zzzzzzz

  6. BP Myers

    @Neil said: Rather than say M-word, we can say short people in general are offended when you describe them as midgets. Just as we can say black people in general are offended when you call them niggers with derogatory intent.

    Hilarious you’d write “the M-word” but have no problem writing nigger. And it’s not “short people in general” who are offended by the word.

    For myself, I got no problem calling people whatever they want to be called. Doesn’t make what they used to be called necessarily taboo in other contexts.

    With respect, I’m gonna assume your entire post was in jest.

  7. Donna Morris

    “I’m not into banning words. But just because they’re not banned doesn’t mean you have to use them.”

    Well said, Dan. This has always been my position also.

Comments are closed.